Book Review: The Radium Girls

Photo from Amazon

Had another lovely evening with The Book Babes of Kendallville discussing The Radium Girls  by Kate Moore.  This was a lengthy book to squeeze into a couple weeks (we had to adjust our meeting times), but it was worth it.  It was literally jaw-dropping ( no pun intended for those of you who have read the book).

Like last month’s book, The Zookeeper’s Wife, I was horrified as I was reading. Instead of war-time casualties of Nazis,  the women in this book were dedicating themselves to a higher purpose (the war effort, supporting family, working towards independents in the progressive era) at Radium Dial companies only to become human sacrifices for greedy corporations.  Written in the increasingly popular narrative-style nonfiction, this reads like a novel, so I really connected to all of the women and their families- and especially their plight.

If you’re hungry for knowledge of a  little-known facet about U.S. history, this book will not disappoint.

Click here for a FREE extended preview of the book from Amazon! 

**I did listen to the Audible audio book, but it was not my favorite production.  The narrator’s style took some getting used to.

The Zookeeper’s Wife: A Book Review

 This month’s pick for The Book Babes was Diane Ackerman’s book, The Zookeeper’s Wife. and I LOVED it.  I was fascinated with the true accounts of the Warsaw uprising, life in the ghetto and how Antonina and Jan sustained life at the zoo- I would say even made it so people could flourish and grow during a time of such oppression.  I’ve read many books (fiction and non-fiction) about WWII, and this was a facet I’ve yet to explore in-depth. Continue reading

Book Review: A God in Ruins

A God in Ruins was my book club’s pick for September’s meeting.  It is hard to get time to read with two little ones, so for this book I rented the audiobook from my local library and used it in conjunction with the e-book from Amazon (very reasonably priced).

a god in ruins

Kate Atkinson uses the character Teddy Todd show the intimate effects of war (WWII specifically) on young men and their families.  Breathtaking scenes of the peaceful English countryside juxtaposed with frightening glimpses of Teddy’s wartime experiences a soldier’s internal struggle tangible- and thus heart-wrenching- for the reader. These same contrasts are seen in the characters throughout the novel- making for a magnificent narrative that  leaves the reader with a true appreciation for life and the little things that make it worth while.

Continue reading